How do I set my prices?

When you first start up it is often hard to know where to pitch your prices

There are three main ways of setting your prices and a number of variations on each

Hourly billing

The traditional model is 1/salary, 1/3 overhead contribution and 1/3 profit. This should be a minimum if you want a sustainable and saleable business. If you are self-employed with no staff then you should still charge a comparable amounts as you are doing the work as well as running the business. You should also allow for your non-chargeable admin and marketing time.  If you want to grow in future you will need to cover employee wages plus a profit margin for yourself without changing your prices too much.

Fixed pricing

Fixed pricing is more normal these days although, for bookkeeping, you may want to offer three months on an hourly rate before fixing. This means that you have more time to cover any teething problems or initial backlog plus you get to work out your likely ongoing hours. 

Once clients are on fixed rate you can use repeating monthly invoices and they can pay you on standing order so you will save admin and credit control time as well as improving cashflow. Most clients also prefer regular outgoings.

The price can be fixed using on a cost plus model based on estimated hours or on value pricing.

Value pricing

This is often confused with fixed pricing but it is based on the value to the client irrespective of the cost.

I once wrote a single letter to HMRC which took no particular research and saved a client £2,400 in tax. The admin that I had to complete, in line with ICAEW guidelines, in order to take on the client actually took longer than writing the letter.

So what do you think I should have charged?

  1. £100 as the notional cost of my time to write the letter
  2. £300 as the cost of my time to speak to the client, carry out all the necessary new client admin including money laundering checks for HMRC and then the time to write the actual letter (this was a one-off piece of work)
  3. £800 as the client would still be better off by £1,600 if the appeal was successful
  4. Not a fixed fee but 50% of any tax saving

There’s a whole chapter on pricing in my book and even that is just the tip of the iceberg.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *